Tractor Grapple

Tractor Grapple

Decisions on a tractor grapple. Do I need a grapple? Which one should I get? Bucket, Root, Rake, Rock etc. So many to choose from.

Why I need a grapple. Tractor grapples or skid steer grapples are just different animals compared to the typical front end loader bucket that you have on your machine.  Choosing grapples and deciding why you need a tractor grapple is important. Theses are things to consider before you make your purchase.

If you have ever cleared trees off your property or someone else’s land you will know gathering, sorting, and piling is a task not to be taken lightly. You maybe able to push a pile with your current bucket, but it is not easy. Sometimes the pile will snag on another root, tree, or stump shifting the entire operation the wrong way. With a tractor grapple you can pick up large piles or logs while they stick out each end which will not happen with a plain bucket.

The typical tractor or skid steer bucket is nice for digging and moving materials such as dirt. They are usually wide open on top and can hold a fair amount of material. It will not  hold brush, stumps, or grab debris like a wicked grapple. Buckets will sometimes hold things along with lots of unnecessary dirt. Grapples hold the brush and debris letting all the dirt slip through the tines.

Scrap grapples have a solid bottom. Rock grapples have their tines close together. Rake grapple really do not have a bottom. Root grapples we believe is the best of all worlds. Although it may not hold small rocks or just skid along the ground or hard surfaces with a flat bottom it can manage to do most of the grabbing and holding of debris as necessary.

3rd Function Hack

3rd Function Hack

As much as we would love to have a 3rd function valve on our tractor we do not. Rather then spending the money we figure we could just add lines from the front to the rear remotes. Now we have a 3rd function hack. Now we can use grapples and other equipment that requires hydraulic fluid up front.

This was really simple to do. At the time of writing this we only spent approximately $170. This included the hydraulic lines which measured forty four feet and all the quick couplers. Most new 3rd function valves start at $400 and at times can be over a $1,000. In most cases after you buy the valve you still have to buy the hydraulic lines and fittings.

This is why we decided to do what we call a 3rd function hack. Relatively simple. In our situation we had the lines done at a Jet Hose and Packing. Rather then spending money on labor or guessing where to mount a third function valve all we did was just run two lines. Since the hoses was built in a couple of hours it was possible for us to install and have the hydraulic lines ready for use the same day.

Now in the future we may very well give up our 3rd function hack. Then we can actually install an auxiliary 3rd function valve and/or other remotes of some sort to be more productive. Until that time comes this is all we need to be satisfied and provide one more option for our customers when it comes to what we can do for them.

Finally it is up to you rather to just choose function over looks with a 3rd function hack or spend a lot more money for the real deal.